Accessibility

Our global life sciences company brings diagnostic testing & drug development together.

Congratulations on your new arrival.

12 weeks after birth of your baby

Fourth Trimester Testing

FourthTrimester-LandingPage-07062021

Post Delivery Care

Sometimes, your doctor may suggest follow-up testing for new moms. Talk to your doctor about if additional tests might need to be performed on you.

Postnatal Testing:

  • Diabetes Screening
Post delivery care

Your body after baby: The first 6 weeks

Many things are happening in your body right after you have a baby. Some changes are physical and others are emotional. More information about common postpartum discomforts and what to do about them can be found here: https://www.womenshealth.gov/mental-health/mental-healthconditions/postpartum-depression. Talk to your provider if you are worried about any discomforts or concerns.

Well-baby exam: what to expect during routine checkups

Testing for your newborn Pediatric Wellness

At your child’s well-baby visit, the doctor or nurse will order screening tests that are most appropriate for your child’s age and risk factors. Pediatric preventative care tests help to detect risks for illness, disease, and other possible health concerns for your child.

infancy-testingwhileexpecting

Infancy

Newborn - 9 months

Tests & Risk Assessment to be performed with appropriate action to follow, if positive:​

  • Anemia risk assessment (4 months)1
  • Lead risk assessment (6 & 9 months)1
  • Tuberculosis risk assessment (By 1 month & 6 months)1  

Other Assessments to be performed routinely, unless otherwise noted:

  • Vision1
  • Hearing1
  • Developmental Screening (9 months)1
  • Developmental Surveillance1
  • Psychosocial/Behavioral Assessment1
earlychildhood-testingwhileexpecting

Early Childhood

12 months - 4 years

Tests & Risk Assessment to be performed with appropriate action to follow, if positive

  • Anemia test (12 months), risk assessment (15 months–4 years)1
  • Lead risk assessment (12, 18, 24 months; 3 & 4 years)*
  • Tuberculosis risk assessment (12 months, 24 months, 3 & 4 years)1
  • Dyslipidemia risk assessment (24 months & 4 years)1

*Perform risk assessments as appropriate, based on universal screening requirements for patients with Medicaid or high prevalence areas. 

For more on childhood tests and risk assessments, visit AAP.org.

Other Assessments to be performed routinely, unless otherwise noted:

  • Vision1
  • Hearing1
  • Development screening: (18, 30 months)1
  • Development Surveillance (12, 15, 24 months)1
  • Psychosocial/ Behavioral Assessment1
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder Screening test (18 & 24 months)1
middlechildhood-testingwhileexpecting

Middle Childhood

5 years - 10 years

Tests & Risk Assessment to be performed with appropriate action to follow, if positive:

  • Anemia risk assessment (5–10 years)1
  • Lead risk assessment (5 & 6 years)1
  • Tuberculosis risk assessment (5–10 years)1
  • Dyslipidemia screening thereafter (9–10 years), continued risk assessment (6 & 8 years)1

Other Assessments to be performed:

  • Vision1

  • Hearing1
  • Developmental Surveillance1 
  • Psychosocial/Behavioral Assessment1
teen-testingwhileexpecting

Adolescence

11 years - 21 years

Tests & Risk Assessment to be performed with appropriate action to follow, if positive:

  • Anemia risk assessment annually1
  • Tuberculosis risk assessment annually1
  • Tobacco, Alcohol, or Drug Use risk assessment annually1 
  • Dyslipidemia screening (annually at 11 years and 17–21 years); risk assessment (annually between 12–16 years)1
  • HIV screening (annually at 15–18 years); risk assessment annually from 11–14 years and 19–21 years)1 
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections risk assessment annually 

Other Assessments to be performed annually, unless otherwise noted:

  • Vision1
  • Hearing1 
  • Hearing: One time between 11–14 years, 15–17 years, and 18–21 years
  • Developmental Surveillance1
  • Psychosocial/ Behavioral Assessment1 

Where can I go to understand more about pediatric genetic conditions?

Everyone hopes that his or her baby is born healthy and most of the time that is true, but sometimes there is a need for further testing to help diagnose conditions that can arise as baby grows and develops.

In the event you want to know more about conditions with a genetic origin, you can find more information on our websites.

References

  1. American Academy of Pediatrics. Recommendations for Preventive Pediatric Health Care. Updated February 2017.
  2. USPSTF A and B Recommendations. https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Name/uspstf-a-and-b-recommendations. Accessed November 15, 2017.
  3. CDC Preventive Care for Adults. https://www.cdc.gov/prevention/index.html. Accessed November 15, 2017.